Storing Your Produce

Produce at Go Organic NYC is fresh from the farm so from our doorstep to yours packaging and storing them in a correct manner is essential to keeping them fresh. Some organically grown produce tend to differ from conventionally grown produce since they are not treated with any type of preservatives to make them last, remember once certain fresh produce is harvested, the primary ingredient that becomes its life force is water so please check out our storing solutions.

  • Artichokes – rinse them in filtered water and while still wet store them in an airtight container.
  • Asparagus – you can keep them for a week outside your refrigerator by loosely placing them in a glass or glass bowl at room temperature.
  • Avocados – if they are hard, place the ones you will eat later in the week in the refrigerator, while the ones I want to ripen up I place in a windowsill. You can place them in a paper bag at room temperature and add an apple to the bag if you want to speed up the ripening process. Apples and bananas give off a gas that causes other fruit to speed up their ripening process.
  • Arugula – arugula should not stay wet. You can dunk in cold water then spin or lay flat to dry. Here you want to place a dry towel around arugula to help absorb any extra moisture.
  • Basil – place your fresh organic basil into an air tight glass jar with a damp paper towel, then leave on a cool counter. Basil is difficult because it does not like the cold or to be wet. Remember to dry your basil.
  • Beans, Shelling – Eat them right away. You can freeze them for later.
  • Beets – some times we receive beets with tops, cut them off and place the green in an airtight glass container with a little moisture. When left on the root, the tops with draw moisture from the root. Remember, your fresh organic produce is very much alive. Some times you can even continue to grow them. But beets should be washed and kept in an open container with a wet towel on top.
  • Broccoli – wrapping a damp towel around them then placing your fresh broccoli in the refrigerator is great, but if the broccoli is limp, cut about a 1/4 inch off the bottom exposing a fresh stalk, then place in a glass container with cold water. Place in the refrigerator if you have room.
  • Broccoli Rabe – best when eaten right away or as soon as possible. If you need to store it, place in an open container.
  • Brussels Sprouts – again, wet, damp towels works well. If you are fortunate enough to be able to purchase them on the stalk, then leave them there and place the stalk in a cool place. If you must, place the stalk in the refrigerator.
  • Cabbage – in a cool room cabbage will be fine for four or five days, longer than that you will see the leaves start to wilt. Remember after a week cabbage will lose its moisture. Even more importantly, remember you can always make sauerkraut or even kim chi if you have too much cabbage. Fermented foods like sauerkraut/ kim chi are really really good for you.
  • Carrots – Love carrots and carrots with tops just look so inviting and lovely. But like beets, cut off the tops. You can restore carrots by placing them in cold water. A damp towel works too.
  • Cauliflower – it seems to last a long time with little intervention other than placing it in the refrigerator. But my taste buds tell me that it is best prepared the day it is bought.
  • Celery – love the crunch and the big flavor of fresh organic celery. Eat it just for that right away, but remember that it can do just fine on the counter in a glass bowl with shallow filtered water.
  • Corn – eating corn the same day it is picked is a real delight in the summer. But to store, leave the husk on in an open container.
  • Cucumber – Keep them in a cool room out, but if you go longer, wrap with damp towel. Refreshing in the summer time with drizzled extra virgin olive oil, fresh squeezed lemon juice and salt and pepper...remember to keep cool as a cucumber.
  • Eggplant – Keep them dry. Eggplant are not big fans of moisture. They will do fine unwashed on the counter for a few days.
  • Fava Beans – we eat them same day or freeze them… love them.
  • Fennel – Treat fennel like celery by placing in water for a few days on the counter. A closed container is needed for longer refrigerated storage.
  • Garlic – keep in a dark cool place.
  • Greens – a cup of water can do wonders to help keep your kale, chard, and collards fresh on the counter. Of course, as we stated earlier, remove all bands. If you place your greens in the fridge, kept them in an air-tight container with a damp cloth.
  • Green Beans – where did I place that damp cloth? Use it again on green beans but don’t keep them wet, just give them a little humidity.
  • Green Tomatoes – well the color says it all. Use before the turn and keep them away from the sun while you wait.
  • Herbs – moisture and mold are what you need to remember with herbs. Fresh herbs need to be used before the week is out. Keep them in a tight container in the fridge.
  • Lettuce – remember what I wrote about the towel and ice earlier; well wrapped lettuce in a wet towel keeps longer.
  • Leeks – fresh leeks are beautiful. a glass container with a shallow level of filtered water or a damp cloth wrapped around the leek works well.
  • Okra – I am not a big fan of okra but those that are know that it does not store well – eat right away.
  • Parsnips – treat them like carrots: see carrots.
  • Potatoes – roots like dark dry places. So I store my potatoes, onions and garlic in a dark corner of a cabinet.
  • Radicchio – I love saying radicchio… damp cloth works magic again.
  • Radishes – again removing the tops prolong freshness then a wet cloth wrap works well. To me, it seems fresh radishes are more sweet than hot…
  • Rhubarb – we have organic rhubarb and we store it with the damp towel method in the refrigerator
  • Snap peas – refrigerate in an open container.
  • Spinach – the king of the greens. Spinach loves cold so we store ASAP in a crisper.
  • Spring Onions – crisper works here too and of course remove the bands and or ties.
  • Summer Squash – I have left cut squash on a cool counter for a few days without a problem. Whole squash is fine on the counter too.
  • Sweet Peppers – if you are using within a couple of days store in a cool room. If you need a longer storage time, use the fridge. Remember to wash them only before you use them. Wetness decreases storage time.
  • Sweet Potatoes – sweet potatoes do not like the cold, so the refrigerator is not a good place. Find a well ventilated place that is cool and dark.
  • Tomatoes – Never refrigerate.
  • Turnips – like radishes and beets remove the greens and store separately. In an open container store with a moist cloth.
  • Winter Squash – some say a week will give them a sweetness if the are stored in a cool dark ventilated place.
  • Zucchini – like summer squash, zucchini will do fine on a cool counter for a few days, even cut.